last updated: 7th January 2017 - Day 180 Light Shadow and Polaron G2 flights

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Construction - Basic

Body

Ring Fins

Flat Fins

Nozzle

Nosecone

Construction - Advanced

Robinson Coupling

Splicing Bottles #1

Splicing Bottles AS#5

Reinforcing Bottles

Side Deploy #1

Side Deploy #2

Mk3 Staging Mechanism

Multi-stage Parachutes

Fairings

Construction - Launchers

Gardena Launcher

Clark Cable-tie

Medium Launcher

Cluster Launcher

Launch Abort Valve

Quick Launcher

How It Works

Drop Away Boosters

Katz Stager Mk2.

Katz Stager Mk3.

DetMech

Dark Shadow Deployment

Articles

Recovery Guide

Parachutes

How Much Water?

Flying Higher

Flying Straight

Building a Launcher

Using Scuba Tanks

Nozzles

Video Taping Tips

MD-80 clone

Making Panoramas

Procedures

Burst Testing

Filling

Launching

Recovery

Flight Computer

Servo Timer II

V1.6

V1.5

V1.4

V1.3, V1.3.1, V1.3.2

V1.2

Deploy Timer 1.1

Project Builds

The Shadow

Shadow II

Inverter

Polaron G2

Dark Shadow

L1ght Shadow

Flight Log Updates

#180 - Light Shadow

#179 - Stratologger

#178 - Coming Soon

#177 - Reefing Chutes

#176 - 10 Years

#175 - NSWRA Events

#174 - Mullaley Launch

#173 - Oobleck Rocket

#172 - Coming Soon

#171 - Measuring Altitude

#170 - How Much Water?

#169 - Windy

#168 - Casual Flights 2

#167 - Casual Flights

#166 - Dark Shadow II

#165 - Liquid Density 2

#164 - Liquid Density 1

#163 - Channel 7 News

#162 - Axion and Polaron

#161 - Fog and Boom

#160 - Chasing Rockets

#159 - Measurement

#158 - Dark Shadow

#157 - Polaron G2

#156 - Foam Flights

#155 - Down The Barrel

#154 - Revisits

#153 - ClearCam

#152 - Mullaley, Axion G2

#151 - Competition Day

#150 - Rocket Salvos

#149 - Glide Fins

#148 - Too Windy

#147 - Descent Rates

#146 - G2 Launcher

#145 - Harness

#144 - Water vs Foam

#143 - Whalan Reserve

#142 - Doonside

#141 - Windy

#1 to #140 (Updates)

 

Rocket Gallery

  This section contains the technical specifications of water rockets built by the Air Command team. They are arranged roughly in order of development.

Rocket variations refer to a typical rebuild of the same rocket. A rebuild is generally due to either damage to the rocket after a hard landing or an added feature.

AC #1 AC #2 AC #3 AC #4 AC #5 Clobrda
AC #6 Little Man Brotanek Cena John John TNT
Jordan X-21 Spek D.Y. Clifford OO
Frankovka J4Y Acceleron Polaron Tachyon Hyperon
Graviton Gluon Axion Baryon Neutrino Photon
Pod 1 Shadow Inverter PETOne Dark Shadow L1ght Shadow

Rocket Naming

The first few rockets did not have names, and were later designated AC #1.. AC#5. Then we used kids nicknames, and a few others. With Acceleron we began using sub-atomic particle names for the rockets. We try to choose the subatomic particle that reflects something unique about the rocket. Acceleron - is used to accelerate upper stages, Graviton performed our zero g-experiments, Gluon was our first use of glue in rocket construction, Neutrino is a small rocket, the Photon rockets are fast. etc.

Click the image below to view a comparison of the rocket sizes,
or scroll down the page for full details and photos.

 

AC #1

AC #1

   
   
Variations: None
Entered Service: 4th June 2006
Capacity: 1.25 L
Nozzle Size: 9 mm
Fill Volume: 390 mL
Dimensions: Length: 300 mm, diameter: 90 mm
Launch Pressure: ~ 40 - 50 psi
Dry Weight: 51 grams
Recovery: None
Current Status: Retired
Notes: First bottle launched on the horizontal launcher. It had no fins or nosecone.

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AC #2
AC #2

(lower right)

   
   
Variations: None
Entered Service: 11th June 2006
Capacity: 1.25 L
Nozzle Size: 9 mm
Dry Weight: Unknown - ~ 110 grams
Fill Volume: 430 mL
Launch Pressure: ~ 30 - 70 psi
Recovery: None
Current Status: Retired
Notes: First bottle launched on the vertical launcher. Simple nosecone made from another bottle. The ring fin used Venetian blinds for struts. These buckled badly on landing.

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AC #3
AC #3

(on launcher)

   
   
Variations: None
Entered Service: 11th June 2006
Capacity: 2 L
Nozzle Size: 9 mm
Fill Volume: 620 mL
Launch Pressure: ~ 30 - 70 psi
Dry Weight: Unknown - ~120 grams
Recovery: None
Current Status: Retired
Notes: First 2L rocket launched on the vertical launcher. The fins were similar to AC #2. Also became quite damaged on impact.

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AC #4
AC #4 (I)

( left )

AC #4 (II)
AC #4 (II)
AC #4 (II)
Variations:  I and II ( Later became Brotanek )
Entered Service: 18th June 2006 ( I )
2nd July 2006 ( II )
Capacity: 1.25L
Nozzle Size: 9mm
Fill Volume: 450 mL
Dimensions: Length: Unknown, diameter: 90 mm
Launch Pressure: Unknown, but around 80psi
Dry Weight: Unknown
Recovery: None. ( I )
Deploying air brakes. ( II )
Current Status: Retired
Notes: This rocket had more solid fin struts ( IC packaging ) and a shaped medium density large nosecone.

Version II later included three air brakes that deployed using a wire ring that would fall off. This worked partially only on one occasion and the design was abandoned. The ring had two sinkers attached on wires that would help work the ring loose as they flapped about.

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AC #5
AC #5

( middle )

   
   
Variations: None
Entered Service: 18th June 2006
Capacity: 2 L
Nozzle Size: 9mm
Fill Volume: 620 mL
Dimensions: Length: Unknown, diameter: 110 mm
Launch Pressure: Unknown, but around 80psi
Dry Weight: Unknown
Recovery: None.
Current Status: Retired
Notes: This rocket had 2 fin struts made out of PVC moulding.

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Clobrda
Clobrda ( I )
( far right )
Clobrda ( II )
( second from right )
Clobrda ( I )
( third from left )
Variations: I and II
Entered Service: 18th June 2006 ( I )
9th July 2006 ( II )
Capacity: 1 L
Nozzle Size: 9mm
Fill Volume: 380 mL
Dimensions: Length: 450 mm, diameter: 80 mm
Launch Pressure: Unknown, but around 80psi
Dry Weight: Unknown
Recovery: None. ( I )
Parachute draped over nosecone. ( II )
Current Status: Retired
Notes: This is a non PET bottle. The nosecone was made from soft foam. This rocket was virtually indestructible because it always made soft landings.

Version II used a handkerchief as a parachute. The parachute was draped over the nosecone. This proved to cause too much drag and although the parachute opened, the rocket didn't gain much altitude. The parachute was removed.

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AC #6
AC #6
   
   
Variations: None
Entered Service: 18th June 2006
Capacity: 2 L
Nozzle Size: 9mm
Fill Volume: 620 mL
Dimensions: Length: Unknown, diameter: 110 mm
Launch Pressure: Unknown, but around 80psi
Dry Weight: Unknown
Recovery: None.
Current Status: Retired
Notes: This rocket had 2 fin struts made out of PVC moulding. The fins were taken from AC#5 The nose cone contained a heavy foam back half of a kids ball. The nosecone also had an outside shell made from the top of a bottle. The body was made from a Coke bottle.

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Little Man
Little Man ( I )
Little Man ( I )
Little Man ( II )
( far right )
Variations: I and II
Entered Service: 2nd July 2006 ( I )
5th August 2006 ( II )
Capacity: 1.25 L
Nozzle Size: 9mm
Fill Volume: 450 mL
Dimensions: Length: 430 mm, diameter: 90 mm
Launch Pressure: ~ 80 psi ( I )
120 psi (typical) 145 psi ( max ) ( II )
Dry Weight: 130 grams
Recovery: None.
Current Status: Retired
Notes: This rocket used as its nosecone part of a foam ball with whistles. The nosecone was considerably heavy and so the fin struts were shortened. The fin struts were made from Venetian blinds which would buckle quite badly on impact.

Later the fin struts were reinforced with bamboo skewers.

This rocket was also the first to reach 145 psi.

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Brotanek
Brotanek ( I )
second from left
Brotanek ( I )
second from left
Brotanek ( I )
Brotanek ( II )
Variations: I and II
Entered Service: 9th July 2006 ( I )
5th August 2006 ( II )
Capacity: 1.25 L
Nozzle Size: 9mm
Fill Volume: 450 mL
Dimensions: Length: 590 mm, diameter: 90 mm
Launch Pressure: 100 - 110 psi (max)  ( I )
120 psi typical - 140 psi (max) ( II)
Dry Weight: 148 grams
Recovery: Parachute using the NOAA technique.
Current Status: Retired
Notes: This rocket was one of the first to be equipped with a parachute. At the time it set the longest flight time of around 17 seconds. This rocket uses IC packaging as fin strut material.

Brotanek II had a new main bottle and a slightly different nosecone.

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Cena
Cena
( second from the right )
Cena
   
Variations: None
Entered Service: 9th July 2006
Capacity: 1.25 L
Nozzle Size: 9mm
Fill Volume: 450mL
Dimensions: Length: 525 mm, diameter: 90 mm
Launch Pressure: 120 psi
Dry Weight: Unknown
Recovery: None.
Current Status: Retired
Notes: This was a good performing early rocket. It made quite a number of flights with little damage done to it. It was painted gold to make it easier to see.

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John John
John John
( left most)
   
   
Variations: None
Entered Service: 30th July 2006
Capacity: 600 mL
Nozzle Size: 9mm
Fill Volume: 230 mL
Dimensions: Length: 410 mm, diameter: 75 mm
Launch Pressure: 80 - 120 (max to date)
Dry Weight: 70 grams
Recovery: None.
Current Status: Retired
Notes: This rocket has a nosecone made from medium density foam, and fin struts are made from bamboo reinforced Venetian blinds. This rocket is pretty tough and survives most landings simply because it is so light.

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TNT
TNT
( third from the right)
TNT
TNT
( fourth from the right )
Variations: None
Entered Service: 30th July 2006
Capacity: 1.25 L
Nozzle Size: 9mm
Fill Volume: 450 mL
Dimensions: Length: 520 mm, diameter: 90 mm
Launch Pressure: 110 psi typical, 130 psi (max)
Dry Weight: Unknown
Recovery: Parachute using the NOAA technique.
Current Status: Retired
Notes: This was one of our first rockets to use a parachute successfully. Later it was painted black to make it easier to see in the sky.

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Jordan
Jordan
( fourth from the left )
Jordan
( third from the right )
Jordan
Jordan
Variations: None
Entered Service: 30th July 2006
Capacity: 1.25 L
Nozzle Size: 9mm
Fill Volume: 370 mL
Dimensions: Length: 460 mm, diameter: 90 mm
Launch Pressure: 100 psi typical 120 psi (max)
Dry Weight: 93 grams
Recovery: None.
Current Status: Retired
Notes: Our lightest and highest flying rocket at the time. It was specifically designed to be lean and lightweight. There was a small brass weight under the medium density foam nosecone.
The first rocket we flew with air only.

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X-21
X-21
   
   
Variations: None
Entered Service: 5th August 2006
Capacity: 2.5 L ( 2 x 1.25L ) Used 6mm Robinson coupling
Nozzle Size: 9mm
Fill Volume: Unknown
Dimensions: Length: Unknown, diameter: 90 mm
Launch Pressure: 100 psi
Dry Weight: Unknown
Recovery: Parachute using the NOAA technique.
Current Status: Retired
Notes: This was our first rocket to use multiple bottles. It suffered from stability issues, and the parachute did not deploy quite well. This rocket later turned into "OO"

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Spek
Spek I
Spek II
Spek II
Spek II
Spek III
Spek III
( third from the right )
Spek III
Variations: I, II and III
Entered Service: 5th August 2006 ( I )
13th August 2006 ( II )
20th August 2006 ( III )
Capacity: 1.25 L
Nozzle Size: 9mm
Fill Volume: 600 - 700 mL
Dimensions: Length: Unknown mm, diameter: 110 mm
Launch Pressure: 110 psi ( I )
80 psi ( II )
120 psi ( III )
Dry Weight: 162 grams without nosecone and camera. (camera = 40 grams)
Recovery: Parachute using the NOAA technique.
Current Status: Retired
Notes: Spek I started out as a single bottle rocket. Spek II was our first rocket equipped with a video camera. The Spek rocket was extended by the camera payload section. The camera was well padded inside the payload section. Both Spek I and II used only 2 PVC moulding struts for the ring fin.
Spek III had an upgraded fin structure, using 3 IC packaging struts. This rocket later evolved into the Frankovka series. The nosecone was also upgraded.

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D.Y.
D.Y.
( third from the left )
D.Y.
D.Y.
Variations: None
Entered Service: 2nd October 2006
Capacity: 2.25 L
Nozzle Size: 9 mm
Fill Volume: 668 ml
Dimensions: Length: 640 mm, diameter: 110 mm
Launch Pressure: 130 psi
Dry Weight: 188 grams
Recovery: Parachute using the NOAA technique.
Current Status: Retired
Notes: This was an experimental 2.25L rocket. It was designed to test two new technologies. The first was the use of plastic strapping bands for bottle reinforcement and the second was an inexpensive and lightweight ring fin design. The fins were attached by bamboo skewers and tape only.

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Clifford
Clifford
Clifford
Clifford
Clifford
( left most )
Variations: None
Entered Service: 2nd October 2006
Capacity: 1.5 L
Nozzle Size: 9mm
Fill Volume: 480 ml
Dimensions: Length: 580 mm, diameter: 95 mm
Launch Pressure: 140 psi
Dry Weight: 162 grams
Recovery: Parachute using the NOAA technique.
Current Status: Retired
Notes: This rocket was named after Clifford the Big Red dog - one of the kids favourite characters. At the time this was our longest flying rocket without a parachute ( parachute failed to deploy) This one went very high.
This rocket also used the same fin design as D.Y. A characteristic of the rocket was the weighted pointy nosecone.

This rocket also had the base heat treated to narrow it so the nosecone could be made aerodynamic. This didn't work too well as the rocket stretched again under pressure, preventing the nosecone from releasing.

It currently holds our flight time record of 48.2 seconds.

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OO
OO ( I )
( fourth from the left )
OO ( I )
OO ( II )
OO ( II )
OO ( II )
OO ( II )
Variations: I  and II
Entered Service: 13th August 2006 ( I )
20th August 2006 ( II )
Capacity: 2.5 L ( 2 x 1.25L ) - 6mm Robinson coupling
Nozzle Size: 9mm
Fill Volume: 750 ml
Dimensions: Length:  mm, diameter: 90 mm
Launch Pressure: 80 psi ( I )
140 psi (typical) 150 psi (max to date) ( II )
Dry Weight:  
Recovery: Version I and II used a single chute NOAA. A number of flights were flown with twin chutes.
Current Status: Retired
Notes: This rocket used to hold Air Command's flight duration record of 31.5 seconds. This is a very successful rocket for us. It has performed very well over a great number of flights.
Version I was the first rocket that used flat fins as opposed to the normal ring fin. The rocket was quite unstable, but may have been due to a faulty nozzle.
Version II had the fins lowered on a ring fin. This rocket also holds the highest pressure rocket launched by us at 150 psi.

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Frankovka
 Frankovka I
 Frankovka II
 Frankovka III
 Frankovka III
Variations: I , II and III
Entered Service: 8th October 2006 ( I )
22nd October 2006 ( II )
11th November 2006 ( III )
Capacity: 4 L ( 2 x 2L ) - 6mm Robinson coupling ( I ) and  ( III )
4.25 L ( 1 x 2L and 1x 2.25L) - 6mm Robinson coupling ( II )
Nozzle Size: 9 mm (typical) - 7 mm experiments
Fill Volume: 1250 ml
Dimensions: Length: 995 mm, diameter: 110 mm
Launch Pressure: 130 psi (typical) 140 psi (max to date)
Dry Weight: 415 grams ( II )
472 grams ( III ) - includes camera and flight computer.
Recovery: Version I and II used a single chute NOAA.
Version III uses side deploying parachute deployed by V1.2 of the flight computer.
Current Status: Retired
Notes: This rocket carried a small video camera. After the last crash, the flight computer was removed, as well as the fin section and used in the Polaron rocket.

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J4Y (J4)

J4Y

J4Y

J4Y
J4Y
J4 II
J4 III
(on left)
J4 IIIb
( right )
J4 IV
Variations: I, II, III, IIIb, IV
Entered Service: 30th November 2006 ( I )
11th January 2007 ( II )
16th September 2007 ( III ) (exploded on launch pad)
30th September 2007 ( IIIb )
18th November 2007 ( IV )
Capacity: 3.75 L  ( 3 x 1.25L ) - two 8mm Robinson couplings ( I )
5 L ( 4 x 1.25L) - three 8mm Robinson couplings ( II )
5 L ( 4 x 1.25L) - three 8mm Robinson couplings ( III & IIIb )
5 L ( 4 x 1.25L) - three 8mm Robinson couplings ( IV )
Nozzle Size: 7 mm or 9 mm
Dimensions: Length:  1260 mm, diameter: 90 mm
Length:  1340 mm, diameter: 90 mm ( III )
Length:  1520 mm, diameter: 90 mm ( IV )
Fill Volume: 1000 - 1100 ml ( I )
1250 ml ( II, III, IV )
Launch Pressure: 130 psi (typical) 135 (max to date) ( I )
Dry Weight: 391 grams ( I )
522 grams ( II )
556 grams ( III ) with camera.
496 grams ( IIIb ) with altimeter, no camera
537 grams ( IV ) with altimeter, no camera, shock absorbing nose cone
Recovery: Parachute using the NOAA technique. ( I & II )
Single parachute V1.3.2 flight computer. ( III, IIIb, IV )
Current Status: Retired
Notes: Our first rocket to use 3 bottles coupled together. The rocket has 3 conventional fins attached to a ring supported by struts. The fins are behind the nozzle. Later renamed to just J4.
J4 II had an extra bottle added and a new nosecone.
J4 III has a new set of fins and a new deployment system. Exploded on the launch pad during filling for first flight.

J4 IIIb has been completely rebuilt with new aluminium couplings. First of our rockets to fly an altimeter.

J4 IV is a rebuild of J4 IIIb after the parachute failed to open and crashed heavily. Being used for foam vs water research.

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Polaron

Polaron

Polaron

Polaron II
Polaron III
A diagram of Polaron III's twin parachute deployment mechanism.

Polaron IV

Polaron IV

Polaron IV

Polaron IVb with Gluon boosters

Polaron IVd with Gluon boosters

Polaron V
with Gluon II boosters

Polaron V
with Gluon II boosters

Polaron VI with Gluon II boosters
(right)

Polaron VI with Gluon II boosters

Polaron VIb with Gluon II boosters

Polaron VII

Polaron VIIIx

Polaron G1

Polaron G2

Polaron G2b

Variations: I, II, III, IV, IVb IVd, V, VI, VIb, VII, VIIIx, G1, G2, G2b
Entered Service: 11th January 2007 ( I )
3rd February 2007 ( II )
18th February 2007 ( III )
26th January 2008 ( IV )
21st February 2008 (IVd dummy)
23rd February 2008 ( IVb )
3rd May 2008 ( V )
31st May 2008 ( VI )
28th February 2009 ( VIb )
13th December 2009 ( VII )
10th January 2010 ( VIIIx )
13th June 2010 ( G1 )
29th January 2011 ( G2 )
10th April 2011 ( G2b )
Capacity: 8 L ( I )
6 L ( II )
8 L ( III, IV  and IVb)
2 L ( IVd )
10L ( V )
12.8L ( VI )
12.8L ( VI b)
12.5L ( VII )
9.8L ( VIIIx )
12.4L ( G1 )
21.4L ( G2 )
16L ( G2b )
Nozzle Size: 9 mm ( I, II, III, IV and V )
8.9 mm ( IVb, IVd, VI )
9.45mm ( VIb )
15mm ( VII )
15mm ( VIIIx )
16mm ( G1, G2, G2b )
Dimensions: Length: 1730 mm, diameter: 110 mm ( I )
Length 1520 mm, diameter 110 mm ( III )
Length: 1420 mm, diameter: 110 mm ( IV & IVb )
Length: 1520 mm, diameter: 110 mm ( IVd )
Length: 1750 mm, diameter: 110 mm ( V )
Length: 1930 mm, diameter: 110 mm ( VI )
Length: 2060 mm, diameter: 110 mm ( VIb )
Length: 2150 mm, diameter: 110 mm ( VII )
Length: 1750 mm, diameter: 110 mm ( VIIIx )
Length: 2070 mm, diameter: 110 mm ( G1 )
Length: 3010 mm, diameter: 110 mm ( G2 )
Length: 2420 mm, diameter: 110 mm ( G2b )
Fill Volume: 1900 mL ( I )
1250 mL ( II )
1900 mL ( III )
2000 mL ( IV and IVb )
1500 mL ( IVd )
2000 mL ( V )
2400 mL ( VI and VIb )
2900 mL ( VII )
2600 mL ( VIIIx )
3000 mL ( G1 )
4000 mL ( G2 )
3800 mL ( G2b )
Launch Pressure: 90 psi ( II ) to date due to leak
130 psi ( III ) max to date
125 psi ( IV ) max to date
110 psi ( IVb ) max to date
100 psi ( IVd )
120 psi ( V )
130 psi ( VI )
120 psi ( VIb )
130 psi ( VII )
110 psi ( VIIIx )
230 psi ( G1 )
~230 psi ( G2 )
240 psi ( G2b )
Dry Weight: 660 grams ( I )
550 grams ( II ) without camera.
689 grams ( III ) with camera. ( 640 g without camera )
880 grams ( IV ) with camera, altimeter and flight computer.
928 grams ( IVb ) with camera, altimeter and flight computer.
~ 850 grams ( IVd )
1072 grams ( V ) with camera, altimeter, parachute and flight computer.
1087 grams ( VI ) with camera, altimeter, parachute and flight computer.
1200 grams ( VIb ) with camera, altimeter, parachute and flight computer.
1230 grams ( VII ) with camera, altimeter, parachute and flight computer.
1080 grams ( VIIIx ) with camera, altimeter, parachute and flight computer. MicroLab mercury switch experiment.
1580 grams ( G1 ) with camera, altimeter, parachute, flight computer, Craig's flight computer.
2200 grams ( G2 ) with camera, altimeter, parachute, flight computer, Craig's flight computer.
1815 grams ( G2b ) with camera, altimeter, 2x parachute, flight computer, MAD backup deploy
Recovery: Uses side deploying parachute deployed by V1.2 of the flight computer. ( I and II )
Polaron III uses the same as above but a second parachute is pulled out by the first, out of a second storage compartment.
Polaron IV, IVb, V and VI uses a single 1.15m diameter parachute. Deployed by version 1.3.2 of the flight computer.
Polaron IVd used NOAA.
Polaron VIb, VII, VIIIx, G1 used version 1.6 of the FC
Polaron G2 uses new in-line deployment mechanism with fiberglass nosecone.
Polaron G2b uses side deploy controlled by V1.6 FC, with back up parachute controlled by ST II with MAD
Current Status: Active
Notes: ( I ) Flight computer and fin section taken from Frankovka. This rocket never flew as it had a major malfunction on the launch pad. One of the bottles severely distorted and the coupling leaked.

This rocket is equipped with a small digital video camera.

Polaron II had one bottle removed, and new fins fitted.

Polaron III was completely rebuilt after Polaron II crashed. All new bottles, new couplings, new payload section with a second chute. New plastic fins attached by large rubber bands.

Polaron IV is newly rebuilt. Special features include:
Top bottle is inverted to allow filling from top.
Reinforced bottle bottoms with another bottle.
FlyCamOne V2 video camera
Z-log altimeter.

Polaron IVb is identical to version IV except for new removable fin set to support the boosters and has launch lugs for the guide rail.

Polaron IVd was a dummy rocket designed to test the booster system in place of the actual rocket.

Polaron V has had an extra 2L bottle added. Designed to fly with Gluon II boosters

Polaron VI has a new body constructed from 3 spliced pairs and using two 22mm tornado couplings. Those are Robinson coupled to the lowest 2L bottle from Polaron V in order to generated foam using Jet Foaming.

Polaron VIb is a complete rebuild of Polaron VI, with a larger fin set, slightly larger nozzle and a new nosecone.

Polaron VII was used to test re-enforced spliced pairs in flight.

Polaron VIIIx was used to fly the first MicroLab experiment. It was built from the remaining bottles used on Acceleron V.

Polaron G1 was reinforced with two layers of 200gsm fiberglass.

Polaron G2 was our first large scale - high pressure rocket.

Polaron G2b CATOed at 250psi on first attempt.

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Acceleron

Acceleron

Acceleron

Acceleron
Acceleron

Acceleron II

Acceleron II

Acceleron II

Acceleron III
with Tachyon sustainer.

Acceleron IIIb
Acceleron IIIb
with Tachyon II
Acceleron IIIb
with Tachyon II
Acceleron IIIb
with Tachyon II
Acceleron IIIb
with Tachyon II
Acceleron IV
with Tachyon III
Acceleron V
with Axion IV
Acceleron V
with Axion IV
Acceleron Vb
with Axion IVb
Acceleron Vc
with Axion IVb
Variations: I, II, III, IIIb, IV, V, Vb and Vc
Entered Service: 11th January 2007 ( I )
31st March 2007 ( II )
5th July 2007 [Exploded during test] ( III )
29th July 2007 ( IIIb )
29th March 2008 ( IV )
4th July 2009 ( V )
25th July 2009 ( Vb )
27th March 2010 ( Vc )
Capacity: 12.75 L ( I )
18.75 L ( II )
24.75 L ( III )
24 L ( IIIb )
18 L ( IV )
30 L ( V and Vb )
28 L ( Vc )
Nozzle Size: 3 x 8.8 mm ( I )
3 x 10 mm ( II )
3 x 10 mm ( III )
3 x 10 mm ( IIIb )
3 x 10 mm ( IV )
3 x 13.5 mm ( V )
3 x 15.6 mm ( Vb and Vc )
Dimensions: Length: 1310 mm, diameter: 3 segments each 110 mm ( I )
Length: 1570 mm, diameter: 3 segments each 110 mm ( II )
Length: 1590 mm, diameter: 3 segments each 110 mm ( III and IIIb )
Length:  1770 mm, diameter: 3 segments each 90 mm ( IV )
Length: 1530 mm. diameter: 3 segments each 110 mm ( V and Vb )
Length: 1420 mm. diameter: 3 segments each 110 mm ( Vc )
Fill Volume: 3.75 L - 1.25 per segment ( I )
5.25 L - 1.75 L per segment ( II )
5.25L ( III and IIIb )
4.5 L - 1.5L per segment ( IV )
9.6 L - 3.2L per segment ( V )
7.5 L - 2.5L per segment ( Vb and Vc )
Launch Pressure: 120 psi. ( I )
120 psi max to date. ( II )
120 psi ( III )
110 psi ( IIIb )
130 psi ( IV )
130 psi ( V & Vb )
120 psi ( Vc )
Dry Weight: 950 grams plus about 600ml of ballast in the dummy payload section. ( I )
1476 grams plus about 600ml of ballast in the dummy payload section. ( II )
Unknown but  ~2000grams ( III )
1980 grams. Includes parachute ( IIIb )
2046 grams. Includes parachute ( IV )
2.9 kg. Including twin parachutes ( V & Vb )
2.88 kg Including twin parachutes ( Vc )
Recovery: 900mm diameter parachute deployed using the NOAA technique. ( I )

Twin chutes - one 900mm diameter parachute deployed using the NOAA technique and pulls out a secondary 420 mm parachute ( II )

Single 1500 mm parachute deployed using FC 1.4.( III, IIIb an IV )

Version V, Vb and Vc use dual redundant systems using V1.6 flight computers with twin parachutes. Primary: 1500mm, Secondary: 1150mm.
Current Status: Active
Notes: This is our first cluster rocket being used to develop a booster for a two stage rocket. It carries a dummy payload section with about 600ml of water for ballast. The water empties before the rocket lands.
Recently it has been fitted with new fins. ( I )

Acceleron II has had a 2L bottle added to each segment, all the bottle bases have been reinforced with strapping tape and a new longer central tube has been added. ( II )

Acceleron III exploded during a static test. ( III )

Acceleron IIIb is the rebuild of Acceleron III with additional reinforcements. Helped set our new personal highest altitude.

Acceleron IV is a rebuild to use the stronger 1.25L bottles instead of the 2L bottles.

Acceleron V is a different design using a ring brace and staging mechanism near the bottom. The booster segments act as guide rails for the long sustainer.

Acceleron Vb is an improved version of V with larger nozzles.

Acceleron Vc uses new reinforced spliced bottles. It helped propel Axion IVb to 810' for the first time.

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Tachyon

Tachyon

Tachyon

Tachyon
Tachyon II
Tachyon II
Tachyon III
Tachyon IV
Tachyon IVb
Tachyon V
(left)
Tachyon V
 
Tachyon VII
 
Tachyon VIII
(top)
 
Variations: I, II, III, IV, IVb, V,  VII, VIII
Entered Service: 23rd June 2007  ( I )
29th July 2007 ( II )
29th March 2008 ( III )
28th June 2008 ( IV )
2nd August 2008 ( IVb )
2nd August 2008 ( V )
10th January 2010 ( VII )
1st August 2010 ( VIII )
Capacity: 2.5 L  ( 2 x 1.25L ) - one 8mm Robinson coupling ( I, II, III, IV and IVb)
3.35L ( V ) 2.1L spliced pair Robinson coupled to 1.25L
3.35L ( VII ) 2.1L spliced pair Tornado coupled to 1.25L
2L ( VIII ) 2x 1.25L spliced pair of bottles.
Nozzle Size: 5 mm, 7 mm or 9 mm ( I, II, III, IV and IVb )
9 mm ( V )
9mm ( VII )
9mm ( VIII )
Dimensions: Length: 770 mm, diameter: 90 mm ( I, II, III, IV and IVb )
Length: 1140mm, diameter: 90 mm ( V )
Length: 920mm, diameter: 90mm ( VII )
Length: 670mm, diameter: 90mm ( VIII )
Fill Volume: 800ml/1000ml as a sustainer.( I, II and III )
800ml when testing as a single stage. ( I & II )
870ml ( IV, IVb )
1300ml ( V )
1000ml ( VII )
600ml ( VIII )
Launch Pressure: 120 psi (typical) ( I )
130 psi (max to date when testing) ( I )
110 psi (typical) ( II )
130 psi (typical) ( III )
180 psi (typical) ( IV )
125 psi  ( V )
130 psi ( VII )
110 psi ( VIII )
Dry Weight: 337 grams ( I ) 
366 grams ( II )
(can be reduced by 30 grams by using a lighter battery)
395 grams + 37grams camera ( III )
470 grams ( IV )
513 grams + 37grams camera ( V )
380 grams ( VII )
260 grams ( VIII )
Recovery: Single 420 mm diameter parachute, deployed by version 1.3.1 of the flight computer. ( I & II ) V1.3.2 for ( III ) V1.5 for ( IV, IVb and V )
flight computer V1.6 ( VII, VIII )
Current Status: Active
Notes: This rocket is specifically designed as a sustainer to operate with Acceleron III.

Tachyon II has had the fin structure upgraded to better support the sustainer during lift-off.
Boosted by Acceleron IIIb held our highest personal altitude record of ~ 192 meters.

Tachyon III is a rebuild after Tachyon II was destroyed. Currently has flown to 188 m (617' ) Flies with FlyCamOne2

Tachyon IV used reinforced bottles, and V1.5 of the flight computer but blew up on the pad.

Tachyon IVb was a rebuild of IV and fitted with new fins.

Tachyon V is has special carbon fiber support tubes and a streamlined lower bottle. It also has 4 plywood fins.

Tachyon VII was used to first test the in-line parachute deployment mechanism.

Tachyon VIII was designed to test the Mk3. Staging mechanism.

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Hyperon
Hyperon
(Left)
Hyperon
Hyperon II
Hyperon III
   
Variations: I, II, III and IIIb
Entered Service: 9th September 2007 ( I )
9th September 2007 ( II )
16th September 2007 ( III )
23rd February 2008 ( IIIb )
Capacity: 5 L  ( 4 x 1.25L ) - three 8mm Robinson couplings ( I )
6.25L ( 5 x 1.25L ) - four 8mm Robinson couplings ( II )
5 L  ( 4 x 1.25L ) - three 8mm Robinson couplings ( III  and IIIb)
The capacity will change in 1.25L increments based on the experiment.
Nozzle Size: 5 mm, 7 mm, 9 mm and 15mm
Dimensions: Length: 1330 mm ( I & III ), diameter: 90 mm.
The length varies depending on configuration.
Fill Volume: ~1200mL depends on rocket configuration and desired flight profile
Launch Pressure: 120-130psi (typical)
Dry Weight: 470 grams ( I )
477 grams ( III ) including 29 grams camera.
467 grams ( IIIb ) not including camera.
Recovery: Single 420 mm diameter parachute, deployed by version 1.3.1 of the flight computer.( I & II )
V1.3.2 flight computer ( III  & IIIb)
Current Status: Retired
Notes: This rocket can be flown in a number of configurations and with different payloads.

The deployment mechanism it uses is a spare from the Tachyon sustainer. The removable fin assembly is from Tachyon I.

Version III was flown with integrated camera and new flight computer.
Version IIIb is a rebuild of Version III

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Graviton
Graviton
Graviton
( left )
Graviton
Variations: None
Entered Service: 30th September 2007
Capacity: 3.75 L  ( 3 x 1.25L ) - two 8mm Robinson couplings
Nozzle Size: 9 mm
Dimensions: Length: 1510 mm, diameter: 90 mm.
Fill Volume: 900 mL
Launch Pressure: 110psi (typical)
Dry Weight: 554 grams with camera + M&M payload
Recovery: Single 420 mm diameter parachute, deployed by V1.3.2 of the flight computer.
Current Status: Retired
Notes: This rocket is based on the Hyperon Standard Platform. The rocket contains a large unpressurised payload section for doing zero-g experiments.

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Gluon
Gluon Booster
Gluon Booster
Gluon II
Gluon II
Gluon G1
Gluon G2
Variations: I, II, G1 and G2
Entered Service: 20th January 2008 ( I )
3rd May 2008 ( II )
5th October 2014 ( G1 )
12th March 2015 ( G2 )
Capacity: 2.1 Liters ( I )
3.35 L ( II )
5.26 L ( G1 )
10.5 L  ( G2 )
Nozzle Size: 13 mm ( I and II )
15.5 mm ( G1 )
15.5 mm ( G2 )
Dimensions: Length: 480 mm, diameter: 90 mm. ( I )
Length: 870 mm, diameter: 90 mm. ( II )
Length: 710 mm, diameter: 110mm ( G1 )
Length: 1400 mm, diameter: 110mm ( G2 )
Fill Volume: 900 mL ( I )
1.25 L ( II )
2.1L ( G1 )
4L ( G2 )
Launch Pressure: 110 - 120psi (typical) ( I )
130 psi ( II )
200 psi ( G1 )
200 psi ( G2 )
Dry Weight: 160 grams with winglets ( I )
127 grams without winglets. ( I )
249 grams with parachute ( II )
480 grams with parachute ( G1 )
870 grams with parachute ( G2 )
Recovery: Tumble recovery. Uses winglets to help it fall sideways. ( I )
Parachute recovery. Parachute deployed on separation ( II, G1, G2 )
Current Status: Active
Notes: Our first spliced rocket. Designed as a drop off booster for the Polaron IV rocket. It is specifically designed to be unstable in flight to aid in recovery. While attached to the main stage it remains stable.

Gluon II was designed to fly with Polaron V.

Gluon G1 was designed for scale test of Polaron G2.

Gluon G2 was used with full scale Polaron G2.

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Axion

Axion
(left)

Axion
Axion II
Axion IIb
Axion IIc
Axion III
Axion IIIb
Axion IV
Axion IV
Axion IVb
Axion V
Axion IVd
Axion G1
(right)
Axion VI
(left to right)Axion VIII
Axion IIIc
Axion III
Axion G2
Axion G3
Axion IX
Axion X
Axion G4
Axion G5
  Axion G6
Variations: I, II, IIb, IIc, III, IIIb, IIIc, IVb, IVd, V, VI, VII, VIII, IX, X, G1, G2, G3, G4, G5, G6
Entered Service: 31st may 2008 ( I )
21st December 2008 ( II )
15th March 2009 ( III )
4th July 2009 ( IV )
25th July 2009 ( IVb )
25th July 2009 ( V )
13th September 2009 ( IVd )
24th April 2010 ( G1 )
13th June 2010 ( VI )
28th August 2010 ( IIIb )
28th August 2010 ( IIb )
30th October 2010 ( VII )
27th March 2011 ( IIIc & VIII)
10th April 2011 ( IIc )
8th May 2011 ( G2 )
25th February 2012 ( G3 )
14th October 2012 (  IX & X )
9th June 2013 ( G4 )
5th October 2014 ( G5 )
26th November 2016 ( G6 )
Capacity: 7.5 Liters ( I )
5.45 Liters ( II )
5.3 Liters ( IIb )
6.3 Liters ( IIc )
3.35 Liters ( III , IIIc )
4.2 Liters ( IIIb )
6.7 Liters ( IV, IVb, IVd and V )
6 Liters ( G1 )
8 Liters ( VI )
7.5 Liters ( VII )
2.1 Liters ( VIII )
8.3 Liters ( G2 )
5.3 Liters ( G3 )
9.6 Liters ( IX )
10.9 Liters ( X )
7.2 Liters ( G4 )
8.2 Liters ( G5 )
5.5 Liters ( G6 )
Nozzle Size: 9 mm, 15mm
9 mm ( IIb, IIc, III, IIIb, IIIc, IV, IVb, IVd, V, VI, VII, VIII, G2, G3, IX, X, G4, G5, G6 )
9.5 mm (G1)
Dimensions: Length: 1960 mm, diameter: 90 mm. ( I )
Length: 1520 mm, diameter: 90 mm. ( II )
Length: 1540 mm, diameter: 90 mm. ( IIb )
Length: 1690 mm, diameter: 90 mm. ( IIb )
Length: 960 mm, diameter: 90 mm. ( III )
Length: 1110 mm, diameter: 90 mm. ( IIIb )
Length: 1060 mm, diameter: 90 mm. ( IIIc )
Length: 1750 mm, diameter: 90 mm. ( IV, IVb, IVd )
Length 1750 mm,  diameter: 90 mm. ( V )
Length 1620 mm,  diameter: 90 mm. ( G1 )
Length 2050 mm,  diameter: 90 mm. ( VI )
Length 1960 mm,  diameter: 90 mm. ( VII )
Length 680 mm,  diameter: 90 mm. ( VIII )
Length 2040mm, diameter 90 mm ( G2 )
Length 1390mm, diameter 90 mm ( G3 )
Length 2400mm, diameter 90 mm ( IX )
Length 2750mm, diameter 90 mm ( X )
Length 1810mm, diameter 90 mm ( G4 )
Length 2160mm, diameter 90 mm ( G5 )
Length ??mm, diameter 90 mm ( G6 )
Fill Volume: 1800 mL ( I and II )
1200 mL ( IIb )
1800 mL ( IIc )
400 grams flour ( III )
1000 mL ( IIIb, IIIc )
1800 mL ( IV ) foam + water
1300 mL ( IVb ) foam + water
1400 mL ( IVd, V ) foam + water
1600 mL (G1) foam + water
1900 mL ( VI ) foam + water
1500 mL ( VII ) foam + water
700 mL ( VIII )
2100 mL ( G2 ) foam + water
1400 mL ( G3 )
2000 mL ( IX, X )
1700 mL ( G4 ) foam + water
2500 mL ( G5 ) foam + water
1500 mL ( G6 ) foam + water
Launch Pressure: 130 psi typical ( I and II )
120 psi typical ( IIb, IIc, III, IIIb, IIIc, VIII )
130 psi ( IV, IVb, IVd and V )
245 psi (G1)
120 psi ( VI , VII )
200 psi ( G2, G4, G5 )
190 psi ( G3 )
125 psi ( IX, X )
200 psi ( G6 )
Dry Weight: 759 grams with camera, FC parachute and altimeter. ( I )
562 grams, no camera and no altimeter ( II )
548 grams (II - new version) including camera, altimeter, parachute, nozzle
585 grams ( IIb )
595 grams ( IIc )
370  grams, no camera and no altimeter ( III )
430 grams, with MAD ( IIIb )
413 grams ( IIIc )
675 grams ( IV )
720 grams ( IVb )
760 grams ( V )
1030 grams (IVd) including camera and ballast.
951 grams (G1)
890 grams ( VI )
805 grams ( VII ) including camera, altimeter, parachute
227 grams ( VIII )
1132 grams ( G2 )
710 grams ( G3 )
805 grams ( IX )
920 grams ( X )
963 grams ( G4 )
1110 grams ( G4 ) including camera, altimeter, parachute, booster ring.
1085 grams ( G5 )
?? grams ( G6 )
Recovery: Parachute recovery. Parachute deployed by V 1.3.1 of the FC. ( I )
Parachute recovery. Parachute deployed by V 1.5 of the FC. ( II, III, IV and IVb)
Parachute recovery. Parachute deployed by V 1.6 of the FC. ( V, IVd, VI, VII )
Parachute recovery. Parachute deployed by V 1.6 of the FC. ( G1 )
Parachute recovery. Parachute deployed by V 1.6 of the FC, triggered by MAD. ( IIb, IIIb )
Parachute recovery deployed by uMAD and Servo Timer II ( III )
Parachute recovery deployed by Servo Timer II ( IIIc, VIII )
Parachute recovery deployed by Servo Timer II ( IIc, G2, G3, IX, X, G4, G5, G6 )
Current Status: Active
Notes: Our first modular rocket made from spliced pairs using 22mm Tornado couplings. The rocket also uses a new parachute made from lightweight rip-stop nylon.

Version II had a spliced pair removed to reduce performance when flying in a smaller area.

Version III was used to test fly flour instead of water.

Version IV was used as the sustainer for Acceleron V.

Version IVb had an upgraded flight computer and larger fins. It was used as the sustainer for Acceleron Vb. On 27th March 2010 it was slightly modified to use a tornado coupling and jet foaming insert instead of a Robinson coupling.

Version V used the top section of IVb and the bottom section and fin set from Tachyon V.

Version IVd used a long boom to place a camera a distance from the rocket in order get information about water behaviour in the lowest bottle.

Version G-1 is a fiberglass reinforced version with spliced pairs wrapped in two layers of 200gsm glass.

Version VI uses a jet foaming insert in the lowest tornado coupling.

Version IIb and IIIb used a MAD to detect apogee.

Version VII had smaller fins, remote arming and spliced pair as the top bottle. Fitted with 8mm jet foaming nozzle. Reached 864' on 30/10/10

Version IIc, III, IIIc and VIII were used for testing the servo timer II prototypes.
Version G2 was used for the first Jet foaming spacer test.

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Baryon

Baryon

Baryon II
(right)
Baryon II
Baryon III
(between boosters)
Baryon IV
(bottom)
Baryon V
(bottom)
Baryon IVb
Variations: I, II, III, IV, IVb and V
Entered Service: 13th July 2008 ( I )
2nd August 2008 ( II )
30th August 2008 ( III )
1st August 2010 ( IV )
29th August 2010 ( V )
22nd January 2011 ( IVb )
Capacity: 2.1 Liters ( I )
7.2 Liters ( II )
9.2 Liters ( III )
3.1 Liters ( IV )
6 Liters ( V )
3.2 Liters ( IVb )
Nozzle Size: 9 mm  ( I, III, IV, IVb and V )
15mm ( II, V )
Dimensions: Length: 590 mm, diameter: 90 mm. ( I )
Length: 1110 mm, diameter: 110 mm. ( II )
Length: 1370 mm, diameter: 110 mm ( III )
Length: 560 mm, diameter: 110 mm ( IV )
Length: 1020 mm, diameter: 110 mm ( V )
Length: 740 mm, diameter: 110 mm ( IVb )
Fill Volume: 800 mL ( I )
2800 mL ( II )
2400 mL ( III )
1000 mL ( IV and IVb)
2000 mL ( V )
Launch Pressure: 110 psi typical ( I )
120 psi ( II, V )
125 psi ( III )
110 psi ( IV )
100 psi ( IVb )
Dry Weight: 293 grams ( I )
657 grams ( II )
959 grams ( III )
280 grams ( IV )
530 grams ( V )
627 grams ( IVb )
Recovery: Parachute recovery. Parachute deployed by staging. The sustainer pulls out a wire to release the parachute.
Current Status: Active
Notes: The version I booster was specifically built to test the Mk2 Katz Stager.
Version II was built to test the Mk2 staging mechanism on a larger booster.
Version III was fitted with drop away boosters.
Version IV and V were designed to test the Mk3 staging mechanism.
Version IVb was used for testing the G2 parachute deployment mechanism

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Neutrino

Neutrino
(top)

   
   
   
   
   
Variations: None
Entered Service: 13th July 2008
Capacity: 600mL
Nozzle Size: 9 mm
Dimensions: Length: 430 mm, diameter: 70 mm.
Fill Volume: 200 mL
Launch Pressure: 110 psi typical
Dry Weight: 130 grams
Recovery: Ballistic recovery.
Current Status: Active
Notes: This sustainer was specifically designed to test the Mk2. Katz Stager.

Has been flown with 200grams of flour instead of water.

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Photon

Photon

Photon II
   
   
   
   
Variations: I and II
Entered Service: 21st December 2008 ( I )
28th February 2009 ( II )
Capacity: 1000 mL ( I and II )
Nozzle Size: 15 mm
Dimensions: Length: 1920 mm, diameter: 30 mm.
Fill Volume: 350 mL ( I )
340 mL ( II )
Launch Pressure: 180 psi typical
Dry Weight: 320 grams ( I )
300 grams ( II )
Recovery: Split nosecone recovery, deployed by V 1.5 FC. ( I )
Split nosecone recovery, deployed by V 1.6 FC. ( II )
Current Status: Active
Notes: This was our first T-8 FTC rocket.

Photon II had a new smaller and lighter fin set and a new flight computer fitted (V1.6)

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Pod 1

Pod 1

   
   
   
   
   
Variations: None
Entered Service: 25th April 2009
Capacity: 4 L
Nozzle Size: 9 mm
Dimensions: Length: 1070 mm, diameter: 110 mm.
Fill Volume: 1.25L
Launch Pressure: 95 psi typical
Dry Weight: 570 grams
Recovery: Parachute recovery. Parachute deployed by V 1.3.3 of the FC.
Current Status: Retired
Notes: This was Paul's rocket design. It is built from 6 other older rocket components that were no longer in use.

It's payload consists of Lego astronauts and an R2 unit.

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Shadow

Shadow

Shadow II
   
   
   
   
Variations: I and II
Entered Service: 12th February 2012 ( I )
30th June 2012 ( II )
Capacity: 5.8 L ( I )
6.36L ( II )
Nozzle Size: 19 mm ( I and II )
Dimensions: Length: 2580 mm, diameter: 62 mm.
Length 2860 mm, diameter 62 mm.
Fill Volume: 1.3L water ( I )
1.7L water ( II )
Launch Pressure: 300-500 psi 360psi max to date ( I )
420psi ( II )
Dry Weight: 1370 grams ( I )
1440 grams ( II )
Recovery: Parachute recovery. Parachute deployed by Servo Timer II. and uMAD. ( I )
Parachute recovery. Parachute deployed by Servo Timer II ( II )
Current Status: Active
Notes: Our first all fiberglass high pressure rocket.
Shadow II is a rebuild of Shadow after it crashed

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Inverter

Inverter

Inverter
   
   
   
   
Variations: None
Entered Service: 26th January 2013
Capacity: 23.4 L
Nozzle Size: 16 mm
Dimensions: Length: 1920 mm, diameter: 3 x 90 mm (flat).
Fill Volume: 6.5L water
Launch Pressure: 120psi
Dry Weight: 1792 grams
Recovery: Parachute recovery. Parachute deployed by Servo Timer II
Current Status: Active
Notes: Rocket uses two side air and one central water pressure chamber joined by an air manifold at the top.

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PETOne

PETOne

   
   
   
   
   
Variations: None
Entered Service: 17th March 2013
Capacity: 1.25 L
Nozzle Size: 22 mm
Dimensions: Length: 390 mm, diameter: 90 mm
Fill Volume: 400mL water
Launch Pressure: 120psi
Dry Weight: 151 grams
Recovery: Lawndart
Current Status: Active
Notes: Rocket is made only out of PET plastic and nothing else. Entry into the Materials challenge..

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Dark Shadow

Dark Shadow #1

Dark Shadow #2
(left)
   
   
   
   
Variations: #1 and #2
Entered Service: 13th March 2015 ( #1 )
12th September 2015 ( #2 )
Capacity: 6.77 L (#1)
7.06 L (#2)
Nozzle Size: 15.5 mm (#1 and #2)
Dimensions: Length: 2850 mm, diameter: 63 mm ( #1 )
Length: 2960 mm, diameter: 63 mm ( #2 )
Fill Volume: 1800mL water
Launch Pressure: 640psi ( #1 )
Dry Weight: 1550 grams (#1 including everything)
1620 grams (#2 including everything)
Recovery: STII and 36" Aerocon parachute
Current Status: Active
Notes: Our first carbon fiber reinforced rocket. Caries Mod 6 logging altimeter, AltimeterOne and HD camera #16 V3

 

 

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L1ght Shadow

L1ght Shadow

   
   
   
   
Variations: None
Entered Service: 10th September 2016
Capacity: 8.2 L
Nozzle Size: 15.5 mm / 38mm MMT
Dimensions: Length: 2260 mm, diameter: 80 mm
Fill Volume: 2800mL water
Launch Pressure: 240 psi
Dry Weight: 1880 grams
Recovery: Parachute deployed by StratoLogger CF triggering ServoTimer II
Current Status: Active
Notes: Rocket is made from fiberglass with an interchangeable nozzle and can fly on 38mm pyro motors.

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