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Flight Log Updates

#190 - Polaron G3

#189 - Casual Flights

#188 - Skittles Part #2

#187 - Skittles Part #1

#186 - Level 1 HPR

#185 - Liquids in Zero-G

#184 - More Axion G6

#183 - Axion G6

#182 - Casual Flights

#181 - Acoustic Apogee 2

#180 - Light Shadow

#179 - Stratologger

#178 - Acoustic Apogee 1

#177 - Reefing Chutes

#176 - 10 Years

#175 - NSWRA Events

#174 - Mullaley Launch

#173 - Oobleck Rocket

#172 - Coming Soon

#171 - Measuring Altitude

#170 - How Much Water?

#169 - Windy

#168 - Casual Flights 2

#167 - Casual Flights

#166 - Dark Shadow II

#165 - Liquid Density 2

#164 - Liquid Density 1

#163 - Channel 7 News

#162 - Axion and Polaron

#161 - Fog and Boom

#1 to #160 (Updates)

 

FLIGHT LOG

Each flight log entry usually represents a launch or test day, and describes the events that took place.
Click on an image to view a larger image, and click the browser's BACK button to return back to the page.

 

Day 124 - Boom and Chase cams
Burnt grass at Doonside is slowly growing back. It's easy to find rockets now.
Chaser and chasee rockets set up. We used the old and the new launchers.
Looking back towards the parking area.
Arming servo timers.
Documenting flights.
Both rockets were launched at 110psi.
Rockets landed well away from trees.
Both rockets landed fairly close.
Downloading video from the camera.
First flight.
Fourth launch, the rockets went almost simultaneously.
It's a drag race, and the wrong rocket is winning.
They both used 900mL of water and a 9mm nozzle.
Grass shoots are starting to spring up.
Without the long grass the landings are a little harder.
Panorama from flight #3.
Just after burnout on flight 2.
Launch sequence of both rockets.
The third flight was very good, and showed a good close-up of the other rocket.
The air pulse is starting.
Ready to go for flight #4.
All rockets returned safely.
On the fourth flight the chasing rocket flew ahead of the camera one so all we got was a water column.
The last flight gave us a good longer look at the flight of the second rocket.
Setting up the boom cam under the pyro launch rails.
Controlling the rate of rotation remotely.
Boom cam set up for the water rocket launch.
About to launch.

Date: 9th September 2012, 8:20am - 1:00pm
Location:
Doonside, NSW, Australia
Conditions:
 5 - 15km/h , mild ~20C, blue skies
Team Members at Event:
 PK and GK

Today was a beautiful day for rockets with blue skies and little breeze. We only brought a couple of small rockets with us because we wanted to try filming from a couple of different camera angles. Since our last visit to Doonside there had been a big grass fire which cleared away all the tall grass. Small green shoots have now started coming out so it looks like someone has mowed the whole field. This makes it really easy to find rockets but also makes it for harder landings.

Chase Cam

We wanted to try the classic chase cam camera angle with one rocket flying just ahead of another and the first looking back at the second. We had tried similar footage a few years back, but the camera was looking sideways. This time we just taped the camera to the side of the rocket so it could look straight down rather than out at an angle.

We positioned the two rockets about 50cm apart and used the one hose with a splitter to supply air to both rockets. We also used two separate strings to launch the rockets. This way we could control the delay between the rockets.

The rockets were filled with 900mL of water and launched at 110psi. We did 5 double launches all together and all flew well and landed without problems. One of the batteries came loose on impact during one landing and so we had to take the nosecone apart and reattach the battery.

Here is a video of the flights and the views from the chase cam.

It was difficult to try to decide how much of a delay there should be between the flights as too short a delay meant that the second rocket could fly out of view sooner, and a longer delay meant that the second rocket would be fairly small in the field of view. So we tried several different delays. On the fourth flight the rockets launched almost simultaneously and the chasing rocket was out of shot very early. The best sequence was on the 5th flight.

Boom Cam

The boom cam is simply a high speed camera mounted at one end of a boom with a pivot point at the other end of the boom. The camera is pointed back towards the pivot point. The rotation of the boom is controlled remotely using a pulley and string. At first we wanted to drive the boom electrically using a motor and gearbox, but the hand controlled movement gave you more control over position and rate of rotation.

Because the camera is pointed back towards the pivot point the subject matter needs to be centered on the pivot point also. A couple of the launch rails at Doonside overhang the mounting pole which allowed us to position the pivot mechanism directly underneath the launch rail and point the camera up at the rocket.

We filmed a few launches of the smaller pyro rockets taking off. These turned out quite well, although on the first one we were a little too slow with the rotation.

On the third flight, something went wrong with the camera and it didn't record the file properly. It was a pity because the rocket CATOed on the pad. It would have been good to get a video of that. The camera just did not want to turn off so we had to pull the battery out.

After that we also set up the boom next to the small water rocket launch pad and ended up getting pretty good video of that.

Here is a video of the boom cam:

The idea is to try to eventually get a "bullet time" like effect with the single camera although the boom needs to be rotating a lot faster. The higher frame rate and faster shutter speed should allow us to get closer to the ideal effect, although you can't quite get the "frozen in time" look with this kind of set-up. In order to get the high speed rotation we would need the boom to spin continuously in order to build up the speed. Ideally for this the pivot point should have the launcher incorporated into it.

We were very happy with the rocket performance as well as the video shots we got from the flights. It's always a bonus when you don't have to do repairs at the end of the day.

Flight Details

Launch Details
1
Rocket   Axion III
Pressure   110psi
Nozzle   9mm
Water   900mL
Flight Computer   ST II - 3 seconds
Payload   HD #11 Cam
Altitude / Time   ? / ?
Notes   Good flight with good deployment. Good landing. Chasee rocket.
2
Rocket   Axion III
Pressure   110psi
Nozzle   9mm
Water   900mL
Flight Computer   ST II - 3 seconds
Payload   None
Altitude / Time   ? / ?
Notes   Good flight with good deployment. Good landing. Chaser rocket
3
Rocket   Axion III
Pressure   110psi
Nozzle   9mm
Water   900mL
Flight Computer   ST II - 3 seconds
Payload   HD #11 Cam
Altitude / Time   ? / ?
Notes   Good flight with good deployment. Good landing.
4
Rocket   Axion III
Pressure   110psi
Nozzle   9mm
Water   900mL
Flight Computer   ST II - 3 seconds
Payload   None
Altitude / Time   ? / ?
Notes   Good flight with good deployment. Good landing.
5
Rocket   Axion III
Pressure   110psi
Nozzle   9mm
Water   900mL
Flight Computer   ST II - 3 seconds
Payload   HD #11 Cam
Altitude / Time   ? / ?
Notes   Good flight with good deployment. Good landing.
6
Rocket   Axion III
Pressure   110psi
Nozzle   9mm
Water   900mL
Flight Computer   ST II - 3 seconds
Payload   None
Altitude / Time   ? / ?
Notes   Good flight with good deployment. Good landing.
7
Rocket   Axion III
Pressure   110psi
Nozzle   9mm
Water   900mL
Flight Computer   ST II - 3 seconds
Payload   HD #11 Cam
Altitude / Time   ? / ?
Notes   Good flight with good deployment. Good landing.
8
Rocket   Axion III
Pressure   110psi
Nozzle   9mm
Water   900mL
Flight Computer   ST II - 3 seconds
Payload   None
Altitude / Time   ? / ?
Notes   Good flight with good deployment. Good landing.
9
Rocket   Axion III
Pressure   105psi
Nozzle   9mm
Water   900mL
Flight Computer   ST II - 3 seconds
Payload   HD #11 Cam
Altitude / Time   ? / ?
Notes   Good flight with good deployment. Good landing.
10
Rocket   Axion III
Pressure   105psi
Nozzle   9mm
Water   900mL
Flight Computer   ST II - 3 seconds
Payload   None
Altitude / Time   ? / ?
Notes   Good flight with good deployment. Good landing.
11
Rocket   Axion III
Pressure   100psi
Nozzle   9mm
Water   900mL
Flight Computer   ST II - 3 seconds
Payload   None
Altitude / Time   ? / ?
Notes   Good flight with good deployment. Good landing. Filming with boom cam.

 

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